Resourceful Man

Things to take when you go camping.

Things to take when you go camping.

Back in August I read post on The Selvedge Yard called Adventures in Camp Vibes about Poler Camping Stuff. I immediately fell in love. They make   classically designed, well-constructed, functional camping stuff “for   people that wonder why everyone is trying to pretend they are  going to   do first ascents on alpine peaks instead of celebrating the  fact that   they are having adventures that are awesome in their own way.” I can   appreciate that. #polerstuff #campvibes

Back in August I read post on The Selvedge Yard called Adventures in Camp Vibes about Poler Camping Stuff. I immediately fell in love. They make classically designed, well-constructed, functional camping stuff “for people that wonder why everyone is trying to pretend they are going to do first ascents on alpine peaks instead of celebrating the fact that they are having adventures that are awesome in their own way.” I can appreciate that. #polerstuff #campvibes

(via polerstuff)

Cy + Roman Steps (V)
This is the last in a series of photographs by Robert Rauschenberg  housed at the San Francisco MOMA. I had heard of Rauschenberg before.  He’s one of Julia’s favorites, which pretty much automatically  legitimized him for me, but I wasn’t familiar with any of his work.
When I finally got a chance to see some of his work, these photos,  taken in 1952 of fellow artist Cy Twobly, immediately  captured my  attention. I don’t think I could articulate exactly what it is about  this series of photos that drew me in, but there’s something about them  that resonates with me.
There’s nothing particularly glamorous about them. What sets them  apart for me is that they are real. Rauschenberg used who/what he had  around him and by so doing created a feeling of tangibility. Something  the everyman could understand and appreciate. He brought out the beauty  in the ordinary.
After all, aren’t we all a piece of work.

Cy + Roman Steps (V)

This is the last in a series of photographs by Robert Rauschenberg housed at the San Francisco MOMA. I had heard of Rauschenberg before. He’s one of Julia’s favorites, which pretty much automatically legitimized him for me, but I wasn’t familiar with any of his work.

When I finally got a chance to see some of his work, these photos, taken in 1952 of fellow artist Cy Twobly, immediately captured my attention. I don’t think I could articulate exactly what it is about this series of photos that drew me in, but there’s something about them that resonates with me.

There’s nothing particularly glamorous about them. What sets them apart for me is that they are real. Rauschenberg used who/what he had around him and by so doing created a feeling of tangibility. Something the everyman could understand and appreciate. He brought out the beauty in the ordinary.

After all, aren’t we all a piece of work.